Without Integrity, Credibility Dies

brian williamsSocial media has been ablaze this week with articles, comments, and creative memes about Brian Williams and the false statements he made about his experience reporting in Iraq in 2003.

Williams’ report, in and of itself, is pretty much meaningless. On the other hand, the significance of his lie permeates much deeper and broader than an event covered over a decade ago.

Americans are so obsessed with meaningless day-to-day nonsense – everything from Bruce Jenner’s gender confusion to what so and so wore last night on Scandal. People think less and less for themselves and rely far too heavily on what the news media tells them is important. The national news media in particular substantially influences what the public knows, thinks, and believes.

For the past couple of decades, the news media in this country have become far more involved in shaping the news, rather than reporting the news. What used to be valued as unbiased reporting has evolved into editorialized pandering to one ideal or another. Every US media outlet I can think of is shamelessly biased either left or right, although they are certainly loath to admit it. All of them, subtly if not overtly, promote their respective political and social agendas.

As the prime time anchor, Brian Williams is the voice of NBC news. As such, both his credibility as a journalist, and consequently the credibility of his entire organization, is now called into question, and rightly so. The credibility of every news organization should be called into question, not because Brian Williams lied, but because the presentation of the news in this country has become disingenuous, cropped and carefully presented in a particular context to deliberately shape public opinion.

We cannot become complacent and accept the blatant falsification of events that are documented and presented as factual, particularly from our news media. Brian Williams should step down permanently, and this incident should be a wake up call to the entire industry.

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3 Questions Every Employee Wants Answered

Compass-And-Old-MapManagement consultants and organizational trainers love building models. There is something very appealing about organizing ideas and strategies to implement a particular vision or objective, especially when managing change. Companies constantly look for ways to make training more meaningful, to cultivate environments in which employees are engaged in their jobs and aligned with the vision. Yet, despite all the development models, performance factors, and evolving priorities, employees ultimately just want the answers to three simple questions:

1. Where are we going?
2. How are we going to get there?
3. What is my role?

Where are we going?

Communicating a clear vision and well-defined objective is essential.  Employees need to know what success will look like.  The answer to this question should define the goal and paint a picture of the future.

How are we going to get there?

Providing a destination without specific directions for how to get there is just asking for mass confusion and conflicting priorities.   Employees need a roadmap – the relevant action steps required to achieve the objective, including the expected timeline and key milestones.

What is my role?

This is, perhaps, the most important question of all.  Everyone wants to know what is expected of them, the skills, deliverables and time required, as well as any potential impact to compensation, job security, work-life balance, etc.

The Fallacy of Authority

authoritySimply put, leadership is the ability to influence others.

Ironically, however, the ability to influence others, either in an organization or in the political arena, ultimately doesn’t depend on an individual’s title or position of authority. In fact, those in positions of “authority” often confuse their ability to inflict their will on others (where authorized by their position or title) as a “right” of leadership. This is frequently the case with new managers and those whose motivation for leadership is based on a desire for authority in the form of personal control and power.

These authoritarian relationships may command respect in a superficial sense, but are void of trust and respect. They are based solely on fear rather than empowerment and personal ownership, and offer no provision for alignment of ideas or ideals. In this self-centric mindset, the emphasis on success is internal. The success of both subordinate individuals and the team is viewed by the manager as being dependent upon his or her personal success. These managers tend to believe that in order to validate their own value to the organization they must make themselves essential to the success of the team.

I see this in teams that are largely dysfunctional when the leader is absent. Decisions cannot be made without the manager’s consent. Personal ownership and accountability is stifled and autonomy is restricted. There is little or no basis of trust in the competence and discretion of the team members. This type of manager hordes power, controls rather than leads, and lacks the self confidence to allow subordinates or the entire team to excel in his absence. They make the success of their team completely dependent upon their presence and participation.

I believe that just the opposite is true of superior leaders – that the true measure of success for a leader is not how necessary he is to the team, but in fact how unnecessary he is. This might sound radical or counter-intuitive, but if a leader has truly done his job, the people who work for him should be able to function autonomously for an extended period of time without the necessity of his direct supervision. They should all be aligned both individually and collectively with the organizational vision and goals. They should each have a strong sense of personal ownership and accountability, both to their leader and to each other. They should exhibit integrity and self-discipline. They should be enthusiastic and self-motivated. And finally, they should have a balanced sense of selflessness (teamwork) and drive for personal achievement. This is the very essence of a high performing team, and the best managers and strongest leaders, in effect, actually make themselves less and less integral as their teams become more and more self-sufficient.

The ability to influence others is a powerful and awesome responsibility. Effective, superior leadership, under which individual and team performance is developed and cultivated to its highest potential, requires uncommon, illusive, and perhaps innate personal qualities.  It requires confidence and vision with a strong sense of purpose.  It requires courage, discipline, and dedication to the development of others.  It requires authority without authoritarianism.  Superior leaders nurture cooperation instead of mandating compliance.  They build consensus and create a culture of alignment in which every member shares in the ownership and accountability.

Why Good Managers Are So Rare

The Four Keys to Being a Trusted Leader

The Character of Leadership Competency Model

Leadership Competency Model Diagram

The Character of Leadership Competency Model – © Bryant Rice, 2013

The Character of Leadership Competency Model was developed through years of personal experience.  It was influenced by the thoughts and ideas from a multitude of sources, and shaped by real world application in my role as a leader, influencer, and developer of people.  I believe that the foundation of superior leadership is comprised of 5 essential core attributes – Character, Discipline, Humility, Courage, and Vision.

Naturally, there are also many essential behaviors that leaders must demonstrate.  Good communication is most often noted as an obvious example.  I certainly agree, however, this model is not intended to be a list of behaviors or habits.  It’s far more a reflection of the values and belief system that superior leaders model in their both their personal and professional lives.  These attributes represent the broadest measure of a leader’s effectiveness and success.

Character

  1. Trustworthy – Trust is a product of character and integrity, and is the foundation for effective leadership.
  2. Speaks with Authority – Leaders speak not out of arrogance (from a perspective of position or title, i.e., ego), but with unwavering conviction and confidence in their vision (truth).
  3. Integrity Above Reproach – Effective leaders must have credibility. This is built on honesty, steadfast principles and standards. Good leadership is a matter of character, and character is defined by integrity.
  4. Resilient – While having many weaknesses and limitations, leaders must be strong and stalwart.
  5. Empathetic – Essential to compassion, sensitivity, and understanding – leaders must give people room to fail as well as succeed. People need encouragement and reinforcement when they struggle. That’s why we coach.

Discipline

  1. Never Compromises Absolutes – It is one thing to compromise on matters of preference, it is quite another to compromise on matters of principle.
  2. Judgment – The application of wisdom. “Knowledge speaks, wisdom listens” (Jimi Hendrix)
  3. Definite and Decisive – Good leaders must be able to make decisions that are clear-headed, informed, and conclusive. The must also communicate objectives in a way that is articulate and specific.
  4. Knows How to Delegate – You simply cannot, and should not, do everything yourself. A few things demand hands-on attention – delegate the rest. Remember what it is you are working for.
  5. Self-Disciplined – Discipline ensures we operate by principle rather than emotion or personal desire.

Humility

  1. Humble – Good leaders are humble with a willingness to serve others first – employees, customers, and company. Competent leaders do not need to seek the spotlight of recognition. Their success is defined not by being indispensable to the organization, but by leading others to lead themselves. The most effective leader is one who makes his own presence unnecessary.
  2. Knows His Limitations – A leader who forgets his own weaknesses will inevitably fail.
  3. Knows When to Change His Mind – Good leaders are definite and decisive, but not inflexible. They do not perpetuate bad decisions (out of ego) and know when to adapt to changing circumstances.
  4. Admits Mistakes – Character and trust is strengthened when leaders admit and take ownership of mistakes.
  5. Does Not Abuse Authority – Having authority does not mean being authoritative.

Courage

  1. Takes Initiative – Acting in the best interest of others, regardless of position or authority.
  2. Doesn’t Run in Face of Opposition – Good leaders do not abdicate their role when challenged. They are steadfast and firm – demonstrating authority and grace under pressure.
  3. Courageous – People do not follow cowards. Character is tested under fire and leaders must demonstrate courage.
  4. Sets a Personal Example – Empowers others through personal actions and integrity – walking the talk.

Vision

  1. Strengthens Others – A leader’s purpose is to make everyone around him better – stronger, more effective, more motivated.
  2. Optimistic and Enthusiastic – Optimistic enthusiasm inspires people. Employees will naturally follow a leader who arouses their hopes, and they will just as surely reject anyone who is perpetually pessimistic.
  3. Focuses on Objectives – A leader focuses on objectives, not obstacles.
  4. Cultivates Loyalty – Through trust, integrity, respect, and selflessness
  5. Passionate – A strong leader cannot be detached or indifferent. He must be passionate and purposeful.
  6. Energetic – Have you ever known an effective leader who was lazy? Leaders must be industrious and enthusiastic.

6 Key Qualities for Extraordinary Sales Success

  1. handshakeBe Achievement Oriented – Money shouldn’t be your goal; it’s only a way of keeping track of your progress.  Make achievement your motivator.  Be both patient and persistent, focusing on your objectives, not the obstacles.
  2. Be Unfailingly Optimistic – ‘Make’ the sale happen.  Go for the close – ask for it.  Don’t be afraid to make mistakes.  Every hurdle cleared is one less obstacle between you and your objective.  Should you stumble and fall, always fall forward.
  3. Make Selling Your Lifestyle – Successful sales people make selling a way of life, not just a job.  They never stop selling and look for opportunities at every turn.  Don’t just work in sales; be a sales professional.
  4. Understand Your Customer’s Motivation – People usually buy on emotion and excitement, not logic and reason.  Ask questions to gain insight into what is driving their purchase decision.  Milan Kundera, the author of The Unbearable Lightness of Being observed, “The stupidity of people comes from having an answer for everything.”  The ability to ask intelligent, relevant, and insightful questions, and actually listen to the answers is supremely valuable and uncommonly rare.
  5. Walk in the Customer’s Shoes – Be sensitive to your customer’s needs.  Understand the difference between their ability to buy and desire to buy.  There is nothing you can do about their ability to buy.  Your goal in selling is to validate the customer’s desire to buy.
  6. Leverage the Strength of Others – Look around you.  Most people are blessed to work with an extraordinarily diverse group of people who, both individually and collectively, possess a wealth of knowledge and experience.  Never be afraid to ask a co-worker for assistance.  Always keep the first point above in mind.